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for themselves and their families when you take away head start that means kids won't be the educational foundation that they need i think politicians should do the right thing all the time. that's it for today. come on back again tomorrow. >> announcer: this is the "bill press show". [♪ theme music ♪] >> hal: very exciting morning. it's hal sparks, of course. how are you? good to see you. and i'm filling in for steph and the mooks as they are referred to commonly on this side of the aisle anyway. but the person i believe that there is actually no -- no pejorative that either fits nor is truly descriptive of is of course, jacki schechner. >> oh aren't you sweet. >> hal: i can think of all sorts of untoward things but of course this is the news jacki schechner. >> yeah, wait until we get to the end of the week and then you can decide what you want to call me? >> all right. >> you want to do the news? >> i do. >> president obama will nomination [ inaudible ]. he served in labor licensing regulation. he has a good history for fighting for the common man, and enjoys huge sup
of it -- >> on the delivery end. >> hal: right. maybe their decision-making procession will be slightly more educated? >> yeah, i think there are a couple of things. i think hagel got nominated at least in part because a lot of the job of the secretary of defense going forward is going to be caring for the people who fought the two wars and having somebody who served the way he did is a good idea. and kerry was the obvious choice once the other thing blew up. >> hal: even before. but i also think it points to -- because he was always a good idea for it even with or without susan rice. he apparently wanted it it was not a -- obviously i think one of the reasons that republicans were so happy with it because they felt they could get an open seat to shoe horn scott brown back in. but here he is picking people for big cabinet positions that are uniquely qualified for the first time. >> yeah, and i think -- you know -- i mean i don't want get entirely sidetracked on this not on a day when mark sanford is back on the ballot -- >> hal: yeah. against stephen colbert's sister. >> no. >
) we weren't educated properly about the drugs. (woman) we are get told that it's bad for you and you don't hear anything else. (man)and yesterday we got into trouble because of (woman) there's no alternative like fair trade, or ethically friendly cocaine yet so we don't have a choice. >>yes, western societies have to take responsibility for the high level of demand in their er, amongst their citizens. if you're a cocaine user, you can either, confront the fact, and acknowledge that the commodity you buy comes from a dirty trade and has real ramifications down the line, or you can say well, to your governments, give me a legitimate way to buy this substance. people will always take drugs. we just need to manage that phenomenon in a way that is the best for society. [ music ] >> bill: hey, good morning, friends and neighbors. and a happy wednesday. wednesday, march 20th. great to have you with us here on the "full-court press" on current tv. wedge to the program. welcome to your program where you get to not only find out what's going on around the world here in our nation's c
, or defund education, they'll say we don't want to cut the entitlement programs, we want education paid for and so forth and so on and then they vote for the people who want to do the opposite. >> hal: yeah or in the case of rand paul eliminate the department of education. >> yes. i have become kind of the avatar for ashley judd even though i don't think that is accidental or that she wanted me to but people in kentucky tend to vote with people who they feel comfortable comfortable and not necessarily people they agree with. and i think that's why she has such a great chance at beating mitch mcconnell. because people are tired of mitch mcconnell. >> hal: in all fairness mitch mcconnell is not comfortable with mitch mcconnell. >> exactly. >> hal: he never seems to feel comfortable with himself. when nancy pelosi was speaker of the house, there were so many stalled bills that were worthwhile that were not getting through jnow there's the exact opposite. there is a stampede of republican bills that are never going to nakt the senate that are going to make it through.
for the state's economic i approval. not only is tom palken challenging him the failure to fix education, to deal with transportation and state issues in texas but also a coalition of bipartisan coalition of the legislature are not happy with his tenure. the blue may be off the road and rick perry in texas. >> michael: how could it be on at all. a little more on texas. on the showed we haddier my bird founder of battleground texas. let's take a listen of this clip clip. >> people think of text as a red state, a beat red state but that's only the people who are turning out to vote. right now we're getting less than 50% of the population that is participating in elections. what we have to do is expand the electorate, bring more people in the process through registration and have better turnout. texas is not as red as it is seen today. >> michael: you hail right at ground zero from the progressive movement there. what are dems trying to do and are they going to be able to penetrate this seemingly impenetrable cass. >> well, jeremy is exactly right in everything that he had to say, but thes
in the military. we want to raise taxes on the wealthy, we want to make investments in education, and job training, and infrastructure and basic research and development and don't want to imposed a huge burden on the poor and working class. at least we have a budget now and at least democrats now can show that deficit reduction can be done responsible. responsibly. >> the lack of a bunt has been an effective talking point for republicans. why do you think they haven't reached an agreement? >> because they're democrats. they have a hard time reaching an agreement about anything. that's why they're democrats. the progressive caucus shows that it is possible to reduce the budget deficit by taking even more away from big corporations reducing corporate welfare to an even larger extent reigning in tax loopholes, and so-called tax expenditures. the democratic budget and senate budget is a very good place to begin. i think the progressive caucus's budget is much better. >> analysts are saying this budget is to the left of obama. many on the left would say we should have expected that. does this give the
to mobilize your membership? when are you going to go after the education communicate, the teachers to come out and make a stand? they're working on that right now. so i think the momentum is not going to die. i think you're going to continue to see efforts to, both on the federal and the state level to take action to promote gun safety measures, things that are wildly popular. even in kentucky, 75% of the citizens say they're for background checks. 65% of kentuckians say they're for registration for guns in the state. so again not all the action has to take place at the federal level. it can happen at the state level as well. >> michael: which is important to remember when you think about that being kentucky the kind of sentiment the kinds of guns people have in this country. before i let you go, it is the anniversary of the iraq war and tell me what president bush's legacy as it pertains to the iraq war. >> well, i was a journalist in 2003 when the iraq war began. i editorialized. i looked at three different occasions we need to be careful about how we go to war. we need to be skeptical o
of countries and the administers of health and education, let them be our partners but then to make sure that the carter center people now go into the villages and do the work. so we have a long string of unbroken tries between the carter center and the people that suffer. >> cenk: right. so many ex-presidents are afraid to try because they don't want to fail. but one of their founding principles is it's okay to fail. when they first started in 1986 nobody thought it was possible to equipment it will guinea worm. turns out it was. tomorrow we'll have part two of the conversation where we get a little bit more into politics. that's also very interesting. when we come back on a separate issue the supreme court will be dealing with doma and prop 8. which way will that go? >> outside of the court, activists on both sides of the issue are already camped out. >> how do you use sexuality as a moral question? ♪ >> cenk: back on "the young turks." the supreme court will be hearing two cases on defense of marriage act, and on prop 8 on california. abc news has more. >> supreme
education basic research infrastructure that create lots of jobs for other people. we have an economy that is designed to do what it's doing and that is to redistribute upward and to benefit those at the very top, and the massive americans don't get that because that's not what i news media is telling them even though it's very clear when you look at the official data. >> michael: a lot of people, david, in living to you argueed more for a stimulus in obama's first term. is this what you're saying here? a greater stimulus would have allayed some of this? >> two things are important. basic economic principle, your spend something my income. my spend something your income. if we had a larger stimulus and we had spent it more wisely we "t" would have had more of an affect. it turns out the money we used to keep teachers and cops on the job although a lot of teachers have since been fired had very little affect. but the money we spent to fix roads, bridges and other infrastructure that we have to eventually fix anyway, that had a tremendously positive affect. we should have not long term
educated about all that medicaid they're not receiving. happy birthday spike lee, mr. rogers and 97 years ago today albert einstein first published his theory of relatively and then had to spend the rest of his life saying yeah nice theory, einstein. this isel "viewpoint." [ ♪ music ♪ ] >> john: good evening i'm john fugelsang and this is "viewpoint." thank you for joining us. if you thought that senate democrats were serious really serious about taking on the nra and passing major gun control legislation after the newtown school massacre, well, i hate to disappoint you but "the new york daily news" got it right with this devastating cover page. "shame on u-s on us, indeed. harry reid moved to drop california senator dianne feinstein's proposed assault weapons ban from the gun control legislation that's protected to reach the senate floor next month. harry reid said he would like to do it but the votes are against her. >> diane has worked so hard on this but urgent now her amendment using most the optimistic numbers has less than 40 votes. not 60. >> john: he's quite broken off. if ha
anything. >> at least a big education. so you can make your own decisions. >> stephanie: that's what he said. this is about education. there's obesity smoke. he's right about everything he's talking about. it is how you address those problems. >> at the same time, the gun regulation issue is in the forefront so they can put those two together. >> stephanie: if he wanted to have a sense of humor, he would dress like mary upons and fly in with an umbrella for his next press conference. >> it would be a spoonful of splenda, not sugar. >> stephanie: representative mark ta can na next on "the stephanie miller show." >> stephanie: hour number three, representative mark takano joins us next to talk about the big week at the supreme court d is marriage equality week. skied jacki schechner if she would make up with me and she said no. >> that's different from all other weeks howe? >> stephanie: you would be feeling festive in some way. >> you've been away a week. i missed you. >> stephanie: prove it. just kidding. okay. she lets me. >> you're going to make that apology call right after the show.
irritated by jesus' anuns education that we have to do this now. people are always telling me, oh no, it's not a government program. well, it's a government program. jesus annunciation of the jubilee is debt forgiveness for everything. >> john: you're exactly right. when i try to talk about this myself i'm to do it by my conservative christian friends jesus said the private individual should help the poor. the government shouldn't pick my pockets to help the poor. jesus didn't have democracy. we do. if jesus chose to vote to help the poor instead of bombing iraq, isn't that a government based on christian values, taking care of the less fortunate? >> i believe that our religious values can inform the way we advocate for different kinds of policies. dr. martin luther king jr. said your faith is the conscience of the politics. that's our conscience at work. but i'm always stunned at the kind of christians that talk to you, john, don't actually have read the bible. jesus said the rich sell all you have and give it to the poor poor. woe to all those who are rich. i feel he got this from his
to be educated, go to work and i'm an example of that. i was able to go to university, finish my degree and work and travel around the country looking the same way i'm looking now. but we knew that all of that will change and that new academics against women with him rise in the country in conflict zones and it turned to be the case, like trafficking of iraqi women, and it started immediately after the invasion. other issues like honor killings, which was fought really an iraqi story. >> i think the american media largely failed in telling the american people that iraqi women enjoyed much greater freedom under sadaam hussein than once they were liberated. maggie, you actually fought in iraq before joining iraq veterans against the war. can you explain the transformation you've experienced over the past 10 years? >> yeah, for me, i was 21 years old, 10 years ago waited to go to iraq. i was young and naive and idealistic and i didn't know that fox news wasn't fair and balanced, and you know, so a lot has changed since then. my experience in iraq, meeting iraqi people, seeing iraqi children, you kn
to educate people about what they are having to do to prepare for climate change. >> bill: i guess you don't expect congress to be able to deal with this. >> we have very high expectations of congress but they haven't been met so far, but given president obama's commitment to this priority, we're looking for the president to do some amazing things, and certainly we will put the -- put our focus back on congress periodically. this event has always been sort of about individuals and cities so in relationship to this event, we thought it made sense to showcase what cities are doing, and also because it is happening at the city level, people are a little less aware of the really inspiring stories. the city of cincinnati is 100% renewable energy it will be by next year. there is a program in san francisco that will take san francisco to 100% renewable energy too. same thing in chicago you are seeing incredible efforts to prepare and invest. >> bill: great work. saturday night tomorrow night, 8:30. it's not complicated just turn off the lights for an hour. thanks so muc
education that is so vital and so important that these members of congress can pay for. when they vote to make medicare a voucher program and then not give a big enough voucher to buy health care, that means a lot of people aren't going to get the health care that they need. a lot of seniors are not going to have the only protection that they have got. you can go right down the line. what about food stamps? they don't care. none of their family are on food stamps so they just cut the program. on the one hand it is a good deal, but, but, but, politicians ought to do the right thing all the time, not just when their son or daughter or brother or sister are getting hurt by the politicians. their votes and policies really do hurt real people and so rob portman, yeah, good for you for seeing the light. wish some of your fellow republicans followed your example and with rob portman had seen the light sooner and seen the light on a lot of other issues. 866-55-press, 866-557-7377, and by the way paul ryan is the worst of all, and john boehner goes along with that as do most
not have had to fight at home that they could have used to start their own business or educate themselves beyond what the g.i. bill did. there's such a drag that it's almost uncharitable. here's what i would like to ask you real quick, if you can. caller: ok. hal: i don't know what time line you were there but it would seem -- caller: my first tour was 2005, another in 2006 and another in 2007 before we started wrapping up. hal: i don't know what your experience was or perhaps other soldiers, but i'm curious as to the day after the mission accomplished speech and banner, what it was like to be a soldier on the ground there going we're not leaving this isn't over. caller: i'll give you a real good example of that. it lamb was heartbreaking. when i was stationed there, i was in one of the worst places to be. to be graphic, the day that he gave game over speech, everything's all good, i literally lost a friend who was pretty much had his head cut off. he drove down the street in the al-qaeda al-qaeda was using piano wire, springing it up to decapitate drivers. i lost my best friend that way
, and -- of making sure that we have -- had more for hire education. >> bill: interesting, yeah so it's the policies really that they saw for president obama that they supported. and on the immigration reform do you believe that a guest worker program will be or should be part of it? i mean we talk about the path to citizenship, and i think there are some differences on that, but most people agree there has to be some path to citizenship even if it's difficult, but the guest worker program is a core controversial part of it. >> it is a difficult part. we definitely have to having a cultural workers here in order to support our economy, but to have some kind of permanent guest worker program in place, that is controversial, and a point of contention. >> bill: yeah, and a lot of people -- democrats and republicans on both sides of that. two important issues, the ryan budget, sounds like we're going to see some action on that today, and on immigration reform. congress woman judy chu thanks for your time this morning. >> thank you. >> bill: all right. of course as
these were wonderful very educated professional people that just had a culture and ideology that we can't get. >> hal: ultimately -- that's -- the unfortunate part of holding on to an argumentative point of view beyond the solution itself. and that's why a lot of major, positive changes are generational. because bigotry is harder to pass on to your kid if they don't have a material reason for the bigotry. once the law is passed and there can be no -- they can no longer be slaves it's harder for his son to argue that point because he no longer has people forced to work below them. four or five generations down the line it gets harder and harder to beat that into your kid's head. and you are finding the youth of israel and the iranian youth -- look at who was running in the streets? they were wearing rocking republic jeans they were -- and the majority of that country because of the amount of warring that was going on are like barely 30 now at the oldest because of how many people were killed and the jasmine revolution as it's called the up rising in the middle east
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18